Things to do in the Sacred Valley, Peru

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Apus Peru FOCUSThings to do in the Sacred Valley, Peru

This series is a collection of travel tips and stories shared by other bloggers and traveler’s around the web.

We hope these tips and stories will inform and inspire you to visit the Sacred Valley. If you have already been, please share a tip on things to see and do in the Sacred Valley.

 

 

 

Sacred Valley Travel Essentials – What You Need To Know About a Visit To The Sacred Valley

Exploring The Sacred Valley – While this article does not provide a lot of text, what it does provide is many pictures to help paint an image of the region, especially for those who have never been. I find images to be helpful to gain a sense of what the culture, and community is like.

The Symbolism Is Strong With This One – This is a fun read that highlights the story of how the beloved ruins of the Sacred Valley came to be.

The photo below is just one example of these ruins. It shows a close up of the God Tunupa
overlooking the city of Ollantaytambo

Things To Do In The Sacred Valley

Hiking With Llamas…And Kids! – Peru is known for its many incredible trekking trails. This one just so happens to be kid friendly! You get the chance to get to hang out with some pretty cool llamas as well as hike with them – who wouldn’t want to do that?!

To Market, We Will Go – It’s no secret that the Cusco region hosts one of the world’s most famous markets drawing many tourists and visitors! As it is a tourist destination, it can be a little hectic at times, remain patient and take your time as this is one stop worth waiting for! Also, please note that some of the vendors may not enjoy having their photo taken, so please ask before doing so!

 

 

Festivals Galore – The Sacred Valley hosts some incredible and exciting festivals throughout the year! This is a great, and helpful calendar of sorts that highlights when each festival takes place as well as a short description of each. The festivals provide a chance to not only see but to take part in the culture.

Learning On Vacation – While visiting, why not take up a few fun and exciting classes? These are just a few that are offered through this particular group. You can take cooking classes, learn how to weave and even learn Spanish!

 

 

Another Path Less Traveled – Speaking of weaving, Apus Peru offers a tour designed to take you away from hiking the dirt trails and instead give you a glimpse at another village tradition – weaving! (don’t worry, we still go hiking). This particular village is one of three that our NGO Threads of Peru works with!

Where To Stay in the Sacred Valley

A Family Friendly Stay – If your looking for somewhere family friendly to stay – look no further! This blog post has you covered! Please note that these suggestions are not limited to just families – anyone can stay! I found this post to be helpful as it highlighted the pros and cons of each of the three main towns located in the Sacred Valley

 

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Photo via www.worldoftravelswithkids.com

 

 

The Best Of The Best – This is a longer list of suggestions on where to stay when visiting the Sacred Valley. Again, these are family friendly but not limited to just families. Each hotel has a fantastic little description along with it, as well as a photo!

Don’t Break The Bank – If you are a solo hiker, or even a couple looking for a quick and clean place to stay, this is a list of many hostels located in the region. With affordable prices, they might be a worthwhile option! I love that this site provides reviews of those who have visited previously so that you know what to expect from each.

Sacred Valley Hotel – recommendations from the folks at Apus Peru. These hotels have been tried and tested by people that work in the area.

 

 

 

 Where To Eat In The Sacred Valley

Looking For Food Fuel In The Sacred Valley – A fantastic travel website that breaks the restaurants down by not only area but cuisine type too! It uses a simple dollar sign to show the range of prices for each restaurant – how helpful! When clicking on each restaurant it will open a new page which has a short description, address, phone and website of each restaurant should they have one.

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Things to do in Trujillo, Peru

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Apus Peru FOCUSThings to do in Trujillo, Peru

This series is a collection of travel tips and stories shared by other bloggers and traveler’s around the web.

We hope these tips and stories will inform and inspire you to visit Trujillo. If you have already been, please share a tip on things to see and do in Trujillo

 

Trujillo Travel Essentials – What you need to know about a visit to Trujillo

A Brief Taste – This website offers up a quick, but helpful read on the history of Trujillo, as well as a short paragraph detailing the climate and community. Perfect if you are in a hurry and need a fast read!

What To Do?  – This website is not a blog, however, it does provide a fantastic list of things that you can do in Trujillo. I especially love that each activity is rated, and has reviews by many who have previously visited! I can’t tell you how much I love reading reviews, they can be so useful! 

 

 

Traveling to Trujillo With Kids

Child-Friendly Activities – This list provides many fun activities for the littles to do on your trip. From horseback riding to exploring on a reed boat, there are always fun and exciting things to do! 

Eating in Trujillo

Looking For Grub – One of the best things to do while traveling is to take the time to try, and enjoy all of the many different culinary experiences. This is a smaller sized list of recommended restaurants to stop at, but full of good content including the locations for each! I will try to pretend I’m not completely jealous!

Where Stay in Trujillo

A Home Away From Home – Again, as with before this is not a blog post but rather a long and helpful list of places to stay in Trujillo. From hotels to hostels, there are plenty and all at very affordable prices! Reviews, ratings and most with free breakfast included!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giving Back to Andean Communities: Apus Peru Student Sponsorship

Fernando

Fernando Echame Melo

Apus Peru  strives to be the kind of company that takes our responsibilities to the communities of Peru seriously. We feel that it is equally important that our hosts, whose home this is, benefit from our presence on their “turf,” as that visitors enjoy their time in this unique and vibrant country!

We believe in a tourism that’s both beneficial to local communities and enjoyable for visitors. With this in mind, Apus is involved in several projects that benefit communities in Peru. One of our proudest is our collaboration with Mosqoy, a Canadian- Peruvian non-profit that “supports the educational and cultural rights of indigenous communities in Southern Peru.”  Apus has currently committed to sponsoring the education of an enterprising young man from the Quechua-speaking weaving community of Huilloc in the Andean highlands in the Cusco region. His name is Fernando Echame Melo.

Fernando himself took the initiative to contact Mosqoy several years ago about help with his future. He was orphaned at a young age and attended a school that Mosqoy did not normally work with. When he heard through a cousin that was already working with Mosqoy about a chance to receive an educational scholarship, Fernando made the arrangements to participate in the selection process and traveled many hours to attend the testing. When his efforts proved successful, Apus Peru happily came on board to sponsor Fernando, who is currently in his fifth semester at the Khipu Institute, studying tourism.

Fernando and Cristian

Fernando with his cousin, Raul

Fernando’s hopes for the future include teaching the villagers of Huilloc Spanish, so that tourism will be a viable economic option for his community. He also hopes to bring tourists to his community to teach them about the centuries-old weaving tradition the village centers around.

Fernando is learning all about his beautiful country’s history, landmarks, and flora and fauna as part of his tourism education. Here he is crossing Keshwa Chaca, which is the last example of an authentic Incan woven bridge. Once widespread, these woven grass bridges spanned steep canyons and river rapids. Keshwa Chaca overhangs the Apurimac River in Southern Peru.

Fernando on trip

Fernando on the Keshwa Chaca rope bridge in Apurimac, Peru

Fernando recently wrote a letter of appreciation to Apus Peru for our help. His youth and enthusiasm shine through as he thanks us and wishes blessings on us for his sponsorship. It’s both poignant and highly gratifying to read his earnest words of gratitude. We are proud and honored to be able to be of assistance to this worthy young man, and we hope to continue helping Andean youth in the future.

Here is an excerpt from Fernando’s letter to Apus Peru:

“The reason for this little note is to thank you for helping me in my college studies and to let you know that all of my childhood dreams are slowly becoming reality, thanks to you. I will always remember you for your unconditional assistance.”

Fernando letter

Fernando 2

Finally, Cara Catanoff of Mosqoy has this to say about Apu’s sponsorship of Fernando:

“I wanted to take this opportunity to express our sincere gratitude for your support of Fernando and the Andean Youth Program. Donors like you keep our programs thriving, and we cannot thank you enough. I think it is particularly special that Apus is based right out of Cusco and is supporting a local tourism student. Amazing! ” 

To learn more about Apus Peru’s projects and offerings for sustainable tourism, visit us at the following links.

http://www.apus-peru.com/responsible-travel/community_projects.htm

http://www.apus-peru.com/tours/special_interest.html